Review of Polling Districts and Polling Places/Stations 2024

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Under the Representation of the People Act 1983, the Electoral Administration Act 2006 and the Review of Polling District & Polling Places (Parliamentary Elections) Regulations 2006, Powys County Council has a duty to divide the district into polling districts and to designate a polling place for each polling district. It also has to keep these arrangements under review.

The arrangements made for United Kingdom Parliamentary elections are also used at all other elections and referenda, except in certain wards at local council elections.

What is a Polling District?

A polling district is a geographical area and the legislation requires that each community must be a separate polling district. If the community is large, and in order to provide easy access, the community can potentially be divided into smaller polling districts.

What is a Polling Place?

A 'polling place' is the geographical area, in which a polling station is located. There is no legal definition of what a polling place is. The geographical area could be defined as tightly as a particular building or as widely as the entire polling district.

Powys County Council has defined each polling district as the polling place rather than a particular building for practical purposes.

What is a Polling Station?

A polling station is the actual area where the process of voting takes place, e.g. a room in a community centre or school.

Your Comments

Any elector registered within the County of Powys can make representations to us. Please send us feedback on any aspect of this review, but more importantly if you are unhappy with the current arrangements we need suggestions for alternative polling stations to allow further consultation.

Under the Representation of the People Act 1983, the Electoral Administration Act 2006 and the Review of Polling District & Polling Places (Parliamentary Elections) Regulations 2006, Powys County Council has a duty to divide the district into polling districts and to designate a polling place for each polling district. It also has to keep these arrangements under review.

The arrangements made for United Kingdom Parliamentary elections are also used at all other elections and referenda, except in certain wards at local council elections.

What is a Polling District?

A polling district is a geographical area and the legislation requires that each community must be a separate polling district. If the community is large, and in order to provide easy access, the community can potentially be divided into smaller polling districts.

What is a Polling Place?

A 'polling place' is the geographical area, in which a polling station is located. There is no legal definition of what a polling place is. The geographical area could be defined as tightly as a particular building or as widely as the entire polling district.

Powys County Council has defined each polling district as the polling place rather than a particular building for practical purposes.

What is a Polling Station?

A polling station is the actual area where the process of voting takes place, e.g. a room in a community centre or school.

Your Comments

Any elector registered within the County of Powys can make representations to us. Please send us feedback on any aspect of this review, but more importantly if you are unhappy with the current arrangements we need suggestions for alternative polling stations to allow further consultation.

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